Young Adults

Links

Homework Help

Flockdraw Free online collaborative drawing tool. Whiteboard based painting and drawing tool that makes it easy for groups to draw together or for individuals to work on their own.

Thinglink Embed interactive links into any photograph.

Dictionary.com A database of dictionaries and thesauri. Also includes a word of the day; language and writing resources; and crossword puzzles and other games.

Researchpaper.com Thousands of ideas and helpful hints for research papers.

Writing and Essay A good guide full of basic tips to write a good essay.

The Perseus Project A digital library offering both original language and English translations of Latin and Greek classics, as well as works from the English Renaissance and the Library of Congress.

Literary Resources on the Net A searchable database of online literary resources.

Shakespeare Browse his complete works.

Ask Dr. Math Can't figure out that math problem? Ask Dr. Math.

Visual Link Languages Learn a language right here with hundreds of free language-learning lessons games and activities. Join us and have some fun.

Amnesty International Learn a language right here with hundreds of free language-learning lessons games and activities. Join us and have some fun.

College Resources

College and University Rankings Links to several different ratings services.

CollegeNET Find the ideal college and apply online.

Educational Testing Service Review for the SAT, ACT, GRE, MCAT, LSAT, GMAT and more.

Go College College search, scholarships, and SAT/ACT testing tips.

Online College Fair Chat with college representatives about programs, admissions, requirements, athletic programs, and student activities.

The Princeton Review How to find a college, get in, and then pay for it. Visit the online counselor to find out which colleges you can probably get into.

To Do

Do Something One of the largest organizations in the US for teens and social change.

Anti-Bullying

StopBullying.gov Provides information from various government agencies on how kids, teens, young adults, parents, educators and others in the community can prevent or stop bullying.

Striving To Reduce Youth Violence Everywhere A national initiative led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to prevent youth violence before it starts among young people ages 10 to 24. STRYVE’s vision is safe and healthy youth who can achieve their full potential as connected and contributing members of thriving, violence-free families, schools, and communities.

National Crime Prevention Council Has a mission is to be the nation's leader in helping people keep themselves, their families, and their communities safe from crime.

Anti-Defamation League The nation's premier civil rights/human relations

WeStopHate A non-profit program dedicated to raising self-esteem in teens (teen-esteem) through various social media platforms that engage teens to help each other gain confidence. 

Social Media A Guide for Teens 

Angels and Doves A nationwide anti-bullying non profit organization.

The National Center for Bullying Prevention Helps to prevent awareness and teach effective ways to prevent bullying.

GLSEN An organization that is working to eradicate bullying and bias in schools. .

The Trevor Project 866 4U TREVOR. It's a 24-hour, national help line for gay and questioning teens.

The Matthew Shepard Foundation Runs Matthew's Place, an online community and resource center for LGBTQ youth.

National Crime Prevention Council Cyberbullying.

Book Awards and Lists

The Amanda Project The story of Amanda Valentino, told through an interactive website and book series for readers aged 13 & up. On the website, readers are invited to become a part of the story as they help the main characters search for Amanda.

Warriors Games, apps and more based on the Erin Hunter books.

Shurtugal.com A comprehensive website for Christopher Paolini's Inheritance Cycle.

The Gallagher Academy Interactive site based on the books by Ally Carter.

Pottermore J. K. Rowling's official Harry Potter companion site.

Alex Awards Adult books for young people.

Michael Printz Awards Outstanding books for young people.

Best Books for Young Adults Lists from the American Library Association.

Margaret A. Edwards Award

William C. Morris YA Debut Award

Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults Award

Odyssey Award For Audiobooks

Fabulous Films for Young Adults

Amazing Audiobooks for Young Adults

Great Graphic Novels for Teens

Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults

Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers

TeenLit

teenreads

Graphic Novel Reporter

ReadingRants Out of the ordinary teen booklists.

Dystopia Week A week’s worth of posts to the science-fiction and fantasy blog Tor.com, each covering a different aspect of book or movie dystopias by bloggers and fiction authors. A great site to sample many different takes on dystopian realms.

The Hub: The Future Sucks - A Visitor's Guide To Dystopia ALSA’s literature blog divides dystopias into three types, giving examples of each along with tongue-in-cheek advice about what to do if you suddenly find yourself living in one.

WorldCat Genres: Dystopias The catalog has sections for both adults and children and teens with updated lists of recent books.

9/11 Resources

America Responds PBS created this website immediately following the 9/11 attacks and now maintains it as an archive of related resources, analysis, and discussion. The site also offers very useful links to PBS content on a wide variety of 9/11 topics and themes. Users will find episodes of Frontline and other TV programs, relevant transcripts from Washington Week, first-person accounts, resources for parents, and lesson plans for teachers.

Newseum: “Today’s Front Pages” "Washington, D.C.’s most interactive museum,” presents newspapers’ front pages in their original, unedited form. These pages from September 12, 2001, represent 147 papers from 19 countries. The ability to compare coverage across geographic boundaries makes this resource a perfect choice for media literacy studies.

September 11: Bearing Witness to History The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History began collecting artifacts and stories right after September 11 that include physical objects (pieces of a plane, melted coins, etc.), images, and audio recordings—many of the curators’ recollections of acquiring and working with the materials. The collection, a work in progress, will continue to grow as more is learned about the events of 9/11. Visitors are invited to share their own “Bearing Witness” stories, which are archived on a site maintained by the September 11 Digital Archive

The September 11 Digital Archive A project of the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University and the American Social History Project at the City University of New York Graduate Center, uses electronic media to collect, preserve, and present the history of September 11 and its aftermath. In addition to the Smithsonian’s “Bearing Witness” stories and other personal narratives, the collection includes email messages, digital images, videos, and sound materials. The archive was accepted into the Library of Congress in 2003, marking the library’s first major digital acquisition.

The September 11 Documentary Project The day after the September 11 attacks, the American Folklife Center issued a public call to ethnographers and folklorists to collect, record, and document America’s responses to the tragedies. This Library of Congress American Memory collection contains a sampling of the materials that were amassed, including sound and video interviews, photographs, drawings, news clippings, written narratives, emails, and other artifacts. As with other American Memory collections, this one offers support materials for teachers. The main American Memory site also provides teaching guides for a broad range of primary sources, as well as an analysis tool for students.

September 11 : A Memorial This site is CNN’s memorial to the victims of the September 11 attacks. It lists those who died (based on records compiled by Legacy.com) and includes information from CNN reports, obituaries, and materials submitted by friends and family. In addition to shining some light on individual’s stories, the educational value of this site lies in discussions with students about information that’s missing or incomplete. Why would family members choose or not choose to share information about their loved ones in such a place? The site was archived in 2004, and now many of the photos are broken images. How does that “look” affect the impact of the site?

9/11 Memorial: Teach + Learn "The National September 11 Memorial Museum at the World Trade Center may not exist yet, but its website boasts some excellent teaching materials and primary sources. The embedded video and audio on the interactive time line brings us voices from the hijacked airplanes and from observers on the ground. This website is one of the few resources to address young children’s needs (Talking to Your Children About 9/11). An ongoing webinar series keeps up with 9/11-related events, such as the death of Osama bin Laden.

The 9/11 Commission Report The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States (also known as the 9/11 Commission) was charged with preparing a full account of the circumstances surrounding the tragedies, including preparedness for and response to the attacks, and recommendations to guard against future attacks. As government publications go, sections of this one make for a fairly compelling read. A graphic novel of the report, such as Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colón’s The 9/11 Report: A Graphic Adaptation (Hill and Wang, 2006), might be just the ticket for making the events more real for young adults.